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August 21, 2016 [ Speech ]

>> 50th Freedom Day Festival - The Gurindji Wave Hill Walk Off

This is my message to the Gurindji community at the 50th Freedom Day Festival. Artist, Brenda Croft, kindly read this message at the venue.

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Hello, everyone, I am Yuki Hokari, Mino’s sister — Japarta’s sister, Nimarra.

Congratulations to you all on the 50th anniversary of the Gurindji Walk-Off. Twelve years after Mino’s passing, I know for certain that he is there with you today.

I wonder if you know that in 1996 Mino had sent letters to 10 different communities asking for permission to visit. Seven communities ignored his applications; two rejected them. The only community that approved his request was the Gurindji country. Old Jimmy told Mino: “Country brought you here.”

Mino knew that it was his mission to tell the world about the Gurindji stories and teachings. He wrote in his book:

In Canberra, Greg Dening once advised me not to write a thesis for three examiners, but to write a book to change the world. This may be what the Gurindji elders expect me to do. All I know is that the Gurindji people spent a lot of time with me — and this is not because they were dedicated to my academic career. They perceived me to be a person who could bring their stories to a wider audience.

Only a few days before his passing in 2003, he finished writing the Japanese version of the book. It was published in 2004, followed by the English version in 2011. We also paired the pictures that Mino took in the Gurindji country with excerpts from his book for a photography exhibition, which has been shown four venues in Japan, with plans for more.

I am always thinking about how to reach out to more people around the world on behalf of Mino and you all, and I believe that any profit from Mino’s work should be returned to Indigenous Australians. Central to that effort is the Minoru Hokari Memorial Scholarship fund at the Australian National University, which supports young scholars studying Indigenous Australians and their culture through fieldwork. I am happy to report that we are very close to reaching the target balance that will enable the fund to provide a $5,000 scholarship every year in perpetuity.

Mino’s fund is very special in that it is supported by many donations, big and small, from all over the world.

As part of my fundraising efforts for the fund, I also create knitting designs under the private label “Nimara & Japarta.” Knitters all over the world gather at one website called Ravelry and come across my designs, learn about Mino and his work with the Gurindji community, and donate to the scholarship fund by purchasing the designs. Thus each of my knitting designs carries the stories of Mino and the Gurindji people.

On Mino’s behalf, I will do everything I can to disseminate his work — what he learned from you — and reach as many people as possible and for as long as possible. That’s what Mino and I can do to return the favor of your accepting Mino into your country.

Congratulations again, and thank you so much for allocating time for Mino during this important event.


May 23, 2011 [ Speech ]

Yuki Hokari's Speech at the book launch


Exactly seven years ago today, May 10, 2004, my brother, Minoru Hokari, the author of this book, passed away in Melbourne. It was lymphoma. He was 32 and just about to start his promising career as a historian.

This is a book that Mino promised the Gurindji people that he would publish and deliver their story to the world.

He asked 10 communities for permission to stay in their community to learn about their history. Seven ignored his requests, two refused and only the Gurindji people accepted him. Mino understood the reason why the Gurindji people accepted him into their community and shared their stories with him. They expected him to spread their stories…throughout Australia, Japan and beyond, to the rest of the world.

He finished his English manuscript for publication soon after his PhD dissertation acceptance in 2001. However, before publishing his own book, he translated Deborah Bird Rose’s Nourishing Terrains and co-translated Ghassan Hage’s White Nation into Japanese. Then, he was diagnosed with cancer.

After the diagnosis, he had only 10 months to live. He started writing a book in Japanese after he was moved to a hospice at the final stage of cancer. He finished writing a few days before his passing, and the book was published a few months later, as Radical Oral History: Historical Practice of Indigenous Australians in Japan. About 4,000 copies have been sold and it has established its status as a long-selling academic book.

However, this Japanese book does not present the full depth and breadth of his research. It is more like a collection of his thoughts and findings from various academic angles, and strongly and persistently conveying the Gurindji’s message:

“Why didn’t white people ask us for permission to enter our country? If they had, we would have welcomed them.”

It was meant to be an introduction to Japanese readers who are not familiar with Indigenous Australians. As Mino had intended, the book was widely read by not only academics but also ordinary people in Japan, which served his mission very well.

Today, I can say, Gurindji Journey IS the book of Minoru Hokari. It is not just an English translation of his Japanese book.

I don’t want to reveal too much of this book, so please read it from cover to cover, even the acknowledgements. Mino is not here to meet you, but you will meet him in this book.

Many people who read his Japanese book say they wish they’d been able to meet him in person and talk to him. He has such a voice in writing. Ann McGrath, Tessa Morris-Suzuki and myself contributed some pieces and those describe him as a person, as a scholar, as a friend, really well.

I know Mino is now happily telling his main teacher, Old Jimmy, about this book. He is relieved that he was able to keep his promise to the Gurindji people.

I have done many things to compensate for my brother’s untimely passing for the last seven years, such as creating a memorial website, fundraising for his memorial scholarship funds at ANU and University of New South Wales, opening photography exhibitions in several locations in Japan, publishing the exhibition catalogue.

Once I thought publishing this book would the last piece that I have to do in order to complete his life.

But I don’t feel at all this is the end or the last thing I will do for him. During these past seven years, some people have lost touch with Mino or myself, but I have helped Mino keep meeting new people and he has influenced their lives. I think we lose some and we gain some in our lives, which keeps us in balance and helps us move forward. Perhaps I will have it translated this book back to Japanese some day.

After all, I believe all the work Mino has done should return to the Indigenous Australian community, therefore, an advance copy of Gurindji Journey was sent to one of Mino’s mentors who is still alive and all royalties from the sale of this book will be directly donated to the Minoru Hokari Memorial Scholarship Fund for fieldwork in indigenous history, founded by the Australian National University.

Lastly, I would like to express my deepest appreciation to those who made this book and the launch possible.

Prof. Ann McGrath, Prof. Tessa Morris-Suzuki, Kyoko Uchida, and those of you who asked me about the existence of an English manuscript. Thank you so much for not letting me give up.

Phillipa McGuinness, Melita Rogowsky, Heather Cam, Sarah Shrubb and Matt Howard at the New South Wales Press and

Gleebooks event manager Christopher Cyrill.
The Co-op Bookshop manager David Skinner

And my bother, Minoru, for having full faith in me and patiently waiting for this day to happen.

Although he is not here today with you, I have made a stamp of his signature, so I will be happy to stamp it on your copy. And I want you to sign on my copy as well.

Thank you for coming and celebrating the publication of this book with us; I hope you will enjoy it.

July 05, 2006 [ Speech ]

::: Minoru Hokari Memorial Scholarship Inaugural Award Ceremony (Australian National University, Canberra) :::

I am Yuki Hokari, the older sister of Minoru Hokari. Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to address you today in this wonderful occasion.

It has been 2 years since my dearest brother, Minoru, left us. I spend every day chasing my two children and I am so occupied to work on his memorial website or do something related to him or his work that I almost forget he is not here with me any more. Then, all of the sudden, the reality of this huge loss strikes me.

Since he always had hoped to get better, he refused to say good bye to anyone. Many people could not see him while he was sick and still have some regrets for not having done enough for him. To keep his memory alive and keep his work moving forward with young scholars, this scholarship fund was established. For those who know Mino, this fund is all about being connected with him.

The network connected to Mino is getting bigger and bigger, through his work, the website and this scholarship. His Japanese book "Radical Oral History" has been selling really well and the fifth batch of copies have printed recently, which adds up to 3500 copies in total. In Japan, we had a conference this past April, discussing Mino's work and more than 100 people gathered from various areas of study.

I assume most of you know my brother in person and you probably see some resemblance with me. I always felt that we were so different, but his friends told me that two of us are the two sides of one coin. We are quite different in personality, but I guess we have the same roots. It is funny that my parents originally thought I would be a scholar and Mino would be a successful businessman, but it turns out to be a complete opposite. And while Mino had such a fulfilled life, I never enjoyed working in Wall Street.

Over the last two years, there has been so many people involved in fundraising activities. In the beginning, donations and help came from those who were close to Mino. Then, those who know Mino indirectly came in. Now, those who never met Mino are joining the activities.

Probably with my wall street nature, I am always thinking about how to raise money for this fund. When I heard about a partial disposal of Mino's two translations from the publisher, I wanted to save as many copies as possible. After all that's my brother's work.

In order to work on this problem, I had to overcome three main obstacles; business, academics and emotions. As I went through the process, I thought about how my bother would have dealt with this situation. He was so good at helping many people work together in overcoming obstacles. It came natural to him.

For example, in Japan, the disposal of books is often unavoidable due to high inventory costs. Although the editor who knows Mino personally tried his best to save all the copies, he could only do so much against business decision of the company. Often the author can buy the books at a discount. Interestingly, the discount does not change even for the books that are going to be disposed. However, the editor gave me a much deeper discount so that I could make some profit to donate the scholarship fund. This was done because he was compassionate about Mino's work and his untimely death.

When I tried to understand about this disposal process, I consulted some academics. They felt bad about the situation, but told me that it was common practice for academic books. Despite some discouragements and warnings, such as "Academics don't write books for money," I wanted to give it a shot. I would not accept it.

So, I sent out e-mail to ask for help, suggesting I would donate ANU's memorial scholarship fund from the sale. The reaction to my call was amazing. My mail was forwarded to so many different people and some forwarded it to a mailing list, some offered to write on their blogs, and I received several orders every day for a few months. As a result, I sold roughly 150 copies each, which were more than 100 orders in total. Even the editor who sold me the books at a substantial discount was amazed with the result and questioned their own ability to publicize books.

My father packed the books to mail out every day. Payment came in as they received the books. We raised about A$1500 from the sale. With my husband's employer's matching gift program, I also doubled the donation.

There are good hearts everywhere. People feel attached to what Mino accomplished and what he would have done. All we need to do is to create the outlet for those good hearts and feelings to come out. Money will come eventually.

Mino always found a way to make very different people work together for a greater good. Maybe that is the lifelong assignment Mino left me. I feel working on raising money for his memorial scholarship is a part of this assignment. The website and this fund make me keep going. I feel like I finally found my "career" and I enjoy it.

This scholarship fund is a core of our passion for Mino. I truly feel his life did not end two years ago. I appreciate Prof. Ann McGrath's idea and efforts to establish this fund, the endowment office hardwork to keep it organized, and everyone's involvement for fundraising. We are all connected to Mino. We are all excited to see the Minoru Hokari Scholars and to see Mino's dream move forward.

I am nearly the end of my speech, so I would like to share some of my dearest brother Mino's wisdom with you. When I face difficulties in various types of relationships such as my family, my friends and in-laws, I always remember my brother's advice. "First, you have to change yourself. You have to change things on your side, then see if others will do the same. If she sees you changed, then what would she do? If she changes for the better, that's great. If she still does not change, oh well, but you have done things on your side, so now you can decide if you should let it go or if you keep working on the relationship." I am telling you that it works really well every time I follow this advice.

On behalf of my parents and my dearest brother, I want to say Thank you very much again to Prof. Ann McGrath and all the members in Endowment office to make this happen. It is very exciting to see our first Minoru Hokari scholar here today and thank you very much for attending this wonderful event today.


Yuki Hokari
July 5, 2006
Minoru Hokari Memorial Scholarship Inaugural Award Ceremony (Australian National University, Canberra)

===================The following part is written in Japanese.===================

保苅実の姉の由紀と申します。このたびは、この素晴らしい機会にお話するお時間をいただき、ありがとうございます。

最愛の弟、実が亡くなってからもう2年になりました。毎日、二人の子供達を追い掛け回し、弟のために立ち上げたメモリアル・ウェブサイトや彼の人生や仕事に関係した何かに関わっていると、彼がもうこの世にいないという事実を忘れそうになります。そして、ある瞬間に突然すさまじい喪失感に襲われます。

弟は最後の最後まで病気が良くなると信じていたので、誰に対しても「お別れ」を言いませんでした。多くの方が闘病中に彼を見舞うことができず、彼が亡くなった今も、十分なことをしてやれなかったと悔やんでいます。弟の思い出を鮮やかなまま大切にし、若い研究者に彼の仕事を受け継いでもらうために、この奨学基金は設立されました。弟を直接知っている方とって、この基金は保苅実と繋がり続けるという意味をもっています。

保苅実をとりまくネットワークは、彼の業績、ウェブサイト、そしてこの基金を通じて、どんどん広がっています。彼の遺した日本語の本「ラディカル・オーラル・ヒストリー」は順調に販売を続け、このたび第5刷が印刷され、合計で3500部となりました。また、日本では、この4月に保苅実の研究について討論するコンファレンスが開催され、幅広い学術分野から100名以上が出席しました。

おそらく、ここにおられる方の多くは弟を直接ご存知でしょうから、きっと私に弟の面影をみておられるだろうと思います。私と彼は全く違うタイプだと思ってきましたが、彼の友人が私達は一枚のコインの両面だと言ってくれました。性格は違うものの、元のルーツは同じだということなのでしょう。面白いことに、私の両親は当初私が研究者になり、実はビジネスマンとして成功すると思っていました。が、結果はご覧の通り全くの正反対でした。そして、弟が充実した人生を送ったのに対し、私自身はウォール街での仕事を心から楽しんだことはありません。

この2年間、この奨学基金への寄付集めに本当に大勢の方が協力してくださいました。最初、寄付や作業への協力の申し出は、弟を直接知る友達の皆さんからでした。次に、弟を間接的に知る方たちが加わり、今では生前の弟を知らない方が協力してくださっています。

おそらく、ウォール街で勤務した経験からなのでしょうが、私は常にどうやってこの基金への寄付を集めようかということを考えています。弟が日本語に訳した二冊の本が一部断裁になると出版社から知らされた時、私はできるだけ多くの部数をこの断裁から救いたいと思いました。結局のところ、処分されてしまうのは弟が遺した作品です。

この断裁からの救済という状況で、私は三つの問題を乗り越えなければなりませんでした。ビジネス、研究者、そして保苅実への想い、です。断裁のプロセスに関わりながら、私は弟だったらどう対応するかと考えました。彼は問題を乗り越えて多くの人たちを一つの目的に向かわせ協力させることが上手でした。ほんとうにそれをごく自然にやりのけたのです。

例えば、日本では在庫にかかるコストが高いため、断裁はよくあることです。弟を個人的に知っている編集者がなんとかして断裁対象となったすべての冊数を救済しようとしても、会社の決定に彼一人ができることは限られていました。通常、著者は自分の本を割引で購入できますが、興味深いことに、この著者割引は断裁対象でも通常の割引率であることが多いのだそうです。が、この編集者がその割引率を調整してくださったおかげで、断裁から救済できた冊数の売り上げから、この奨学基金に寄付することができました。これはこの編集者の方が、弟の仕事と彼の早すぎる死を惜しんでくださった気持ちから実現できたことだといえます。

また、私はこの断裁のプロレスを理解しようとし、何人かの研究者の方に状況を相談しました。皆さん断裁という状況を気の毒に思ってくださったのですが、学術書にはよくあることだと教えてくれました。「研究者はお金のために本を書くわけではありませんから」という言葉や警告にもかかわらず、私は諦めたくありませんでした。やるだけやってみようと思いました。

そこで、私は売り上げからANUの保苅実記念奨学基金に寄付することを明記して、断裁からの救済をEメールで呼びかけました。この呼びかけに対する反響は驚くべきものでした。私のメールは大勢の方に転送され、その中の方が参加しているメーリングリストで紹介し、また何人かの方がご自身のブログで紹介してもいいかとメールをくれました。そして、数ヶ月にわたって、注文のメールが毎日届き続けたのです。その結果、合計で100件以上の注文を受け、二冊の訳書をそれぞれ約150冊ずつ売ることができました。断裁対象の本を売ってくださった編集者の方が驚き、出版社の営業担当の能力を思わず疑ったほどです。

毎日私の父が本を包装し発送しました。支払いは、購入者が本を受け取ってから指定口座に振り込まれました。この売り上げから1500豪ドル(1300米ドル、約14万円)を集めることができ、また、私の夫の勤める会社のマッチング・ギフトという制度を使って、この寄付額を二倍にしました。

保苅実を取り巻く温かい想い、温かい心は今もあちこちに息づいています。多くの人々が保苅実が成し遂げたこと、そして彼が成し遂げたであろうことに、強い共感と想いを寄せています。私達がすべきことは、その想いが形となって現れることができるような出口をつくってあげることなのです。基金への寄付は必ず後からついてきます。

弟は、正しい目的に向かって、様々な立場の異なる人々が共に手を取り合うことのできる方法を常に見つけました。これこそが、彼が私に遺してくれた生涯の課題なのではないかと、この保苅実記念奨学基金への寄付運動がその課題の一つではないかと感じるのです。ウェブサイトとこの基金があってこそ、私は毎日を生きています。やっと楽しめる「キャリア」と出会った思いがします。

この奨学基金は、私達が保苅実に対して抱えている情熱の核です。弟の人生が2年前に終わってしまったとは私は思っていません。この基金の設立を考案してくださったAnn McGrath教授や、この基金を管理してくださっている事務局の皆さん、そして、寄付集めに協力してくださった大勢の方達に、心から御礼を申し上げます。私達は皆、今も保苅実とつながっています。今回、保苅実記念奨学金が一人の研究者に受賞されること、そして、彼の夢がまた一歩前進することを興奮しながら見つめています。

私のスピーチも終わりに近づいていますので、ここで私の最愛の弟から授かった知恵について、皆さんにお話したいと思います。家族や友人や義理の家族などの様々な人間関係の中で、私が困難な状況を迎えた時、必ず彼のアドバイスを思い出します。

「まず、由紀ちゃん自身が変わらなきゃね。由紀ちゃんの側で出来ることをやって、その上で相手が同じように努力するかどうかを見るんだよ。もし由紀ちゃんが変わる努力をしているのに相手が気づいたら、そしたらその人はどうするかなぁ。もし彼女も良い方向に変わろうとしたら、最高だよね。もし彼女が何も変わろうとしなかったら、そしたら仕方ないよ。由紀ちゃんのほうでやるべきことはやったんだからさ、もうあとはその人との関係に見切りをつけるか、引き続き努力してみるか、それは由紀ちゃんが決めればいいんじゃない?」

このアドバイスに従うと、必ず人間関係が好転することは、私が保証します。

両親と最愛の弟に代わって、ここでもう一度、Ann McGrath教授と事務局の皆さんに、この奨学基金を設立してくださったこと、管理してくださっていることに、心より御礼を申し上げます。今日、この場で初めての受賞者を迎えられることは本当に嬉しいことです。皆様、本日お集まりくださり、本当にありがとうございました。


保苅由紀
2006年7月5日 オーストラリア国立大学
保苅実記念奨学金 第一回授与式にて

November 13, 2004 [ Speech ]

::: Introduction of the International House Minoru Hokari Memorial Scholarship (University of New South Wales, Sydney) :::

I am Yuki Hokari, the older sister of Minoru Hokari, who passed away in May this year after living with cancer for 10 months. Probably I should say that he fought against cancer, but it seems to me that he tried to live with cancer and fight against chemotherapy. Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to address you today in this wonderful occasion.

When I heard news from Donald and Dr. Lundy about this memorial scholarship, I felt this is more than perfect for the memory of his short, but fulfilled life. As everyone says, his life truly exemplified the values of international relationship.

My brother obtained a bachelor and master degree at Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo and came to Australia in 1996 to study Australian Aboriginal culture and history. He first came to this University of New South Wales and lived at the International House. His supervisor moved to Australian National University, so he finished his PhD at ANU in 2001.

Since he got diagnosed with Lymphoma, a lymph cancer, last July, I have received the number of e-mails from his friends. I noticed many of them were from his friends in International House. They seem to be back in their home countries, but shared many precious memories of Minoru with me and showed me a lot of love and support for him.

I have lived in the United States for the past 10 years with an American husband and 3 year old son. Mino's professor in Japan told me that I inspired him to study abroad. I remember Mino told me he had a struggle with his English and based on my experience I advised him to watch as many movies as possible, to find someone who is patient and kind enough to deal with his poor English, and just not to give up for at least one year. It is very hard to live in a foreign country, but once you overcome the initial set of struggles, your world widens enormously. I know that from my own experience and I can see my brother achieved it wonderfully.

I want to share a little story with you. I believe this is Mino's little secret for better relationships. Unlike my brother, I am easily angered, and I often complained to him about my run-ins with my husband, my parents and in-laws. Of course, I was fishing for sympathy, but instead he would always say:

"Yuki, I understand how you feel, but I also understand how the others feel. They aren't blameless, but neither are you. So, what to do? First, you should take a hard look at your own shortcomings, and do what you can to solve the problem from your end. Then, once they see you're making an effort, maybe they'll change their attitude as well. Of course, they may not change at all. But at least you've done everything you can."

Every time I would shoot back, "What d'you think I am, some kind of saint?" or "Why should I always be the one to change my attitude?" In this respect, Mino could be rather unsympathetic toward his family - but I think it was only because he believed that unless he could convince his own family members to change their attitudes, he could never gain the understanding of friends and acquaintances and of the world at large.

Since my brother passed away, I've had about three arguments serious enough to threaten my relationship with each of those people. When I was done yelling and screaming, I took a deep breath, wondering what to do next. That was when I heard Mino's voice. And when I asked myself, "How would he handle this? What would he say? How would he act?" I saw what I needed to do - and in each case, the situation was then resolved.

I believe his advice to me was his basic theory and secret for better relationships. He must have applied this secret to various relationships, such as his friends from all over the countries, his academic fellows, and of course, his aboriginal friends. Also, he must have applied it to his work to fill the gap between the historical truth and facts from the western academic standpoint and aboriginal histories described by aboriginal people's point of view. He was pursuing "historical truthfulness" a concept proposed by Tessa Morris-Suzuki, rather than just "historical truth."

I wish I had been able to say to him when he was still here, "Thank you, Mino, you were right. I followed your advice and it worked out perfectly." But I realize that he will live on in me in this way and continue to be a part of my life.

On behalf of my parents and my dearest brother, I want to say Thank you very much again to Dr. Robert Lundy, Donald Jenner and everyone in the scholarship committee to make this happen and thank you very much for coming here today.


Yuki Hokari
November 13 2004
"Introduction of the International House Minoru Hokari Memorial Scohlarship"

===================The following part is written in Japanese.===================

はじめまして、保苅実の姉、由紀と申します。弟は10ヶ月間がんと共存し、今年5月に永眠いたしました。普通は「がんと闘った」と表現するのでしょうが、私には彼はがんと共存しようとし、化学療法と闘ったように思えます。今回このすばらしい機会に皆様にご挨拶する機会をいただきましたこと、心より御礼申し上げます。

DonaldとDr. Lundyからこの記念奨学金のことを知らされた時、私は彼の短くも充実していた人生にとってこれほどふさわしい話はないと感じました。皆さんがおっしゃるように、彼の人生は真にインターナショナルハウスの理念を実現したものでした。

私の弟は、学士号と修士号を東京の一橋大学で修得し、1996年にオーストラリア先住民アボリジニの文化と歴史を学びにこの国に来ました。彼はまずこのニューサウスウェールズ大学に在籍し、インターナショナルハウスで暮らしたのですが、彼の博士論文指導教官がオーストラリア国立大学に移籍したのに伴って、2001年そちらで博士号を修得しました。

悪性リンパ腫、リンパ球のがんと診断された昨年7月以来、私は彼の友人からたくさんのメールを受け取りましたが、その多くはインターナショナルハウス時代の友人からであることに気づきました。皆さんそれぞれ既に母国にお戻りのようですが、実の思い出を私に語ってくださり、また、たくさんの愛情と友情で彼を支えてくださいました。

私は10年ほどアメリカに暮らしており、現在アメリカ人の夫と3歳になる息子がいます。一橋大学の教授は、私の影響で彼が外国で勉強する決意をしたのだろうとおっしゃってました。実が英語に苦労していると私にこぼしたことがあり、自分の経験から私はできるだけたくさんの映画を見、彼の拙い英語に辛抱強くそして親切に接してくれる友人を探し、とにかく最初の1年だけはどんなに辛くても決してあきらめないようにアドバイスした記憶があります。外国で暮らすというのは大変なことです。が、当初の困難を乗り越えることができれば、自身の世界と可能性は無限に広がります。それを、私は自分の経験から知っており、弟はそれを見事に達成したと思います。

今日は、一つのエピソードを皆さんにお話したいと思います。これはより良き人間関係を築くための実の小さな秘密だと私は信じています。私は実と違って、よく腹を立てる人間なのですが、夫や義理の家族、私自身の両親とのいさかいを実に愚痴ることがよくありました。私にしてみれば、弟に味方してもらいたいから、愚痴っているのですが、彼はいつもこう言いました。

「由紀ちゃん、僕は由紀ちゃんの気持ちもわかるけど、相手の気持ちもわかるよ。相手にも問題はあるけど、由紀ちゃんの側にだって問題はある。そこで、どうするか。まずは、由紀ちゃんの方が自分の側の問題を見つめた上でできることをやる。そして、相手にそれが伝われば相手も態度を変えるかもしれない。そしたら、二人の関係は良くなるよね。もちろん、もしかしたら相手は何も変わらないかもしれない。でも、少なくとも由紀ちゃんの方でできることはやったってことになるよね。」

そのたびに、私は「そんな聖人君子みたいなことができるか」「どうして私ばっかりが態度を改めなきゃいけないのか」と不貞腐れていました。実は、私達家族に対してとても厳しかったと思います。でも、それは自分の家族を説得できなければ、変えられなければ、友達や知人や世の中の人の理解を得ることなどできないと思っていたからではないか、と私は思います。

彼が亡くなってから、3度ほど相手との関係が危うくなるかのような大きなケンカをしました。怒鳴り散らした後で、深呼吸してどうしようかと考えた時、実の声が聞こえました。そして、彼だったら、どう考えるだろう、どう言うだろう、どう行動するだろう、と考えた時、どうすべきかが見えました。そして、その結果は全て良しと出たのです。

彼の私へのアドバイスは、より良き人間関係を築くための彼の基本的な理論と秘密だったと私は信じています。おそらく彼はこの秘密を様々な人間関係に適用したに違いありません。世界各国から来ている彼の友人、研究仲間、そしてもちろん彼のアボリジニの友人達に、です。また、彼はこの理論を、西洋学術的見地からの歴史的真実と、アボリジニの人々の立場から語られた彼らの歴史の間にあるギャップを埋めるためにも使ったに違いありません。彼が求めていたのは、「歴史的真実」ではなく、テッサ・モーリス=鈴木氏が提唱する「歴史に対する真摯さ」でした。

彼が生きているうちに、「みぃちゃん、貴方の言うとおりにしたらこんなにうまくいったよ、ありがとう。」と伝えることができたら、と思います。でも、こういう形で、実は私の中に生き続けるのだと気付きました。

私の両親と最愛なる弟に代わりまして、Dr. Robert Lundy、Donald Jenner、そして奨学基金委員会の皆様に、この基金設立を実現してくださったこと、心より御礼申し上げます。今日は、わざわざお集まりいただいて、本当にありがとうございました。


保苅由紀
2004年11月13日 ニューサウスウェールズ大学
インターナショナルハウス 保苅実記念奨学金 第一回授与式にて

June 19, 2004 [ Speech ]

::: Talking with HOKARI Minoru (Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo) :::

Please allow me to introduce myself: I'm Yuki, Mino's older sister. Over the course of our correspondence since I first e-mailed you about my brother's illness, I've come to feel very close to you, despite living in the US, geographically the farthest place from Australia. So I am truly grateful for this opportunity to be able to meet you in person.

In hindsight, I think Mino had intended that first mass e-mail telling you he'd fallen ill primarily for those who were involved in publishing his work and who would therefore be directly affected. As he had no Internet access at the time, my brother had no choice but to ask me to e-mail everyone in his Hotmail address book.

But your response was so overwhelming - so many messages flooding in, letting him know how well-loved he was - that he was moved to tears of joy. I believe it was then that he began to long to stay connected with all of you, until the very end.

Mino was and will always be my dearest, most beloved brother.

Even now, I haven't been able to physically process the fact of his death yet. Even as I sort through his belongings, it feels as if I'm doing it not because he has passed away, but because he has said to me, "Yuki, you know I'm no good at this stuff; won't you take care of it for me?"

When the cancer recurred and we decided to undergo a bone marrow transplant, Mino said, "You're so tough, living under all that stress, I bet with a bone marrow transplant from you the cancer will never come back," and I agreed. Even between siblings the chances of a bone marrow match are only about 25%. Having beaten the odds and come up with a match, I was convinced my brother would live.

When I traveled to Melbourne with my family after being told that a transplant was no longer possible, I said to Mino, "I guess your body really didn't want my bone marrow. Then again, maybe it's more like you to fight off the cancer on your own than to have to live the rest of your life being grateful to me!" My brother laughed and said, "I hadn't quite thought of it that way."

I want to share a little story with you. Unlike my brother, I am easily angered, and I often complained to him about my run-ins with my family, in-laws or friends. I was fishing for sympathy, of course, but instead he would always say:

"Yuki, I understand how you feel, but I also understand how the others feel. They aren't blameless, but neither are you. So, what to do? First, you should take a hard look at your own shortcomings, and do what you can to solve the problem from your end. Then, once they see you're making an effort, maybe they'll change their attitude as well. Of course, they may not change at all. But at least you've done everything you can."

Every time I would shoot back, "What d'you think I am, some kind of saint?" or "Why should I always be the one to change my attitude?" In this respect, Mino could be rather unsympathetic toward his family - but I think it was only because he believed that unless he could convince his own family members to change their attitudes, he could never gain the understanding of friends and acquaintances and of the world at large.

Since my brother passed away, I've had about three arguments serious enough to threaten my relationship with each of those poeple. When I was done yelling and screaming, I took a deep breath, wondering what to do next. That was when I heard Mino's voice. And when I asked myself, "How would he handle this? What would he say? How would he act?" I saw what I needed to do - and in each case, the situation was then resolved.

I wish I had been able to say to him when he was still here, "Thank you, Mino, you were right. I followed your advice and it worked out perfectly." But I realize that he will live on in me in this way and continue to be a part of my life.

I'm sure that Mino has left many words and thoughts with you, too. I ask that you keep his words alive in your daily routines and in your life. I believe this is what it means to "stay connected" with him, as he had wished up to the very end.

I hope to always feel Mino's presence in the sunlight, the white clouds, the moon and stars, and to cherish his words to me. I hope you, too, will stay connected with Mino forever.

Thank you very much for coming today.


Yuki Hokari
June 19, 2004
"Talking with HOKARI Minoru" at Hitotsubashi University

===================The following part is written in Japanese.===================

 

はじめまして、実の姉の由紀です。オーストラリアから一番遠い国アメリカにいて、実が発病して皆さんとメールをやりとりするようになってから、貴方達の存在は私にとても近く、今回このような形で実際にお目にかかれる機会を得たことを、本当に嬉しく感じています。

今 から思えば、彼が発病したことを皆様にお知らせしたあの一括メールは、弟にしてみれば、出版関係などの仕事でご迷惑をおかけすることになる方にお知らせす るというのが主たる目的だったと思います。ネットへのアクセスがなかった当時、私に頼んで、Hotmailに登録してあった全てのアドレスにああいう形で お知らせを流すしか手段がありませんでした。

が、あまりにも多くの方からお見舞いのメールを受け取り、これほどまでに皆さんから慕われていることを知り、嬉しさで涙を流したと聞いています。そして、それが亡くなるまで、皆さんと繋がっていたいと望むようになったきっかけになったのだと私は思います。

実は、私にとって本当に可愛い大事な弟です。

私はまだ実がいなくなったということが体ではわかっていなくて、遺品の整理をしていても、それは実が死んだからやっているのではなく、「由紀ちゃん、俺、こういう作業苦手だからさ、頼むよ」と言われてやってるような感じです。

再 発して、私からの骨髄を移植するということになったとき、「あれだけのストレスためて生活している由紀ちゃんの骨髄をもらったら、絶対に再発しないと思 う」と彼は言ってましたし、私もそう思ってました。兄弟でも25%の確率でしか完全マッチはしないという骨髄が一致したのですから、彼は絶対に私の骨髄で 生きると信じてました。

そして、骨髄移植ができないとわかり、私が家族でメルボルンに行った時、「よほど、貴方の体は私の骨髄を入れるの が嫌だったみたいね。でも、私に一生恩着せられて生きるよりも、自分の力で癌を克服するほうが貴方らしいかもね。」と言うと、「そんな風には考えなかった けどなぁ。」と笑っていました。

今日は、一つのエピソードを皆さんにお話したいと思います。

私は実と違って、よく腹を立てる人間なのですが、夫の家族や友達とのいさかいを実に愚痴ることがよくありました。私にしてみれば、弟に味方してもらいたいから、愚痴っているのですが、彼はいつもこう言いました。

「由 紀ちゃん、僕は由紀ちゃんの気持ちもわかるけど、相手の気持ちもわかるよ。相手にも問題はあるけど、由紀ちゃんの側にだって問題はある。そこで、どうする か。まずは、由紀ちゃんの方が自分の側の問題を見つめた上でできることをやる。そして、相手にそれが伝われば相手も態度を変えるかもしれない。そしたら、 二人の関係は良くなるよね。もちろん、もしかしたら相手は何も変わらないかもしれない。でも、少なくとも由紀ちゃんの方でできることはやったってことにな るよね。」

そのたびに、私は「そんな聖人君子みたいなことができるか」「どうして私ばっかりが態度を改めなきゃいけないのか」と不貞腐れ ていました。実は、私達家族に対してとても厳しかったと思います。でも、それは自分の家族を説得できなければ、変えられなければ、友達や知人や世の中の人 の理解を得ることなどできないと思っていたからではないか、と私は思います。

彼が亡くなってから、3度ほど相手との関係が危うくなるかの ような大きなケンカをしました。怒鳴り散らした後で、深呼吸してどうしようかと考えた時、実の声が聞こえました。そして、彼だったら、どう考えるだろう、 どう言うだろう、どう行動するだろう、と考えた時、どうすべきかが見えました。そして、その結果は全て良しと出たのです。

実が生きているうちに、「みぃちゃん、貴方の言うとおりにしたらこんなにうまくいったよ、ありがとう。」と伝えることができたら、と思います。でも、こういう形で、実は私の中に生き続けるのだと気付きました。

皆さんにも、彼は多くの言葉を残したと思います。どうかそれを皆さんの生活の中、人生において活かし続けてください。そうすることが、彼が最後まで望んだ「繋がっている」ということではないかと思います。

私は、陽の光や風、白い雲、月や星の中に、実をいつも感じて、彼の言葉を大事にしたいと思っています。皆さんもどうかいつまでも実と繋がっていてやってください。

今日は、わざわざお集まりいただいて、本当にありがとうございました。


保苅由紀
2004年6月19日
保苅実さんと語る会にて(一橋大学 佐野書院)